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The insight community toolbox: ‘do’ activities

We all know that what people say, does not always correspond with what they actually do. This phenomenon is also referred to as the ‘say-do gap’ and is especially visible in topics where people are prone to maintain a positive image by giving socially desirable responses. This often explains deviating election-poll results, or why stats are off for sensitive topics such as racism, substance use, smoking, or bankruptcies. Wanting to understand human behavior, it is thus not enough to focus on what people ‘think’ and ‘feel’; what they ‘do’ is another vital part of the research mix.

The insight community toolbox: ‘feel’ activities

Neuroscientists have found that if the brain’s emotions network is damaged, people would lose their ability not only to laugh or cry, but also to make decisions. Likewise, when making a decision, one does not say ‘What do I think about this’, but rather ‘How do I feel about this’. Clearly, emotions are key drivers of decision making.
This strong impact of emotions on behavior also has implications for marketing research, where ‘feel’ activities should be an integral part of the research mix.

The insight community toolbox: ‘think’ activities

For a long time, the dominant belief among philosophers, scientists and economists was that humans – and their decision making – are driven predominantly by ratio, and this was no different in marketing research. While we now understand that human behavior is complex and requires a multi-dimensional approach, ‘think’ activities are still an important part of the research mix – they allow to grasp the perceptions, opinions and attitudes people can easily express.

Choosing the right research activities: the power is in the mix

For a long time, the dominant belief among philosophers, scientists and economists was that humans are driven predominantly by ratio. And this was no different for marketing researchers. But how realistic is this? Can we truly unravel and understand complex human behavior by solely focusing on their ‘thinking’?

Understanding consumer trends and local culture [an interview with GSK]

Understanding consumer trends and local culture [an interview with GSK]

We invited Jo Stanbridge, Global Insight Lead Sensodyne at GSK, to share her experience on collaborating with leading-edge consumers to fully understand the importance of consumer trends and how they manifest within different cultures.

The consumer-centricity lighthouse [an interview with L’Oréal]

We invited Gaël Chevé, CMI International at L’Oréal Active Cosmetics (Cerave, La Roche Posay and Skinceuticals), to talk about the value of collaborating with ‘the 90’ or everyday consumers, and how this helps L’Oréal to further develop their consumer-centric thinking.

Meet-‘the-1-the-creative-consumers

Meet ‘the 1’: the creative consumer

“Creativity isn’t a luxury, it’s a necessity!” , says Duncan Wardle. With these words, the former Walt Disney Company’s Head of Creativity & Innovation argues that creativity can give companies a competitive edge. He refers to tech giant Apple as an example; this brand became a synonym for creativity; it also dominated BCG’s top 50 list of most innovative companies for the last 15 years.

Meet-‘the-9-the-leading-edge-consumers

Meet ‘the 9’: the leading-edge consumers

All of us everyday consumers can share our everyday needs and frictions; but only a limited number of people can signal ‘things to come’, thereby curating the future. Those are the ones living on the edge – heavy users, trendsetters or early-adopters; they know precisely what is hot and next in a particular area.

You are not your consumer

You are not your consumer

Any idea what the ‘Facebook Phone’, the ‘Microsoft Band’ and ‘Apple’s butterfly keyboard’ have in common? No, it has nothing to do with technology; all three products failed, with ‘a misfit with the market’ as most cited reason.

Think outside the box, in the year of the ox

Think outside the box in the year of the ox

At times like these, it is important that brands strive to put consumers first, connecting and collaborating with them continuously….

Meet the 90, the 9 and the 1

Not all consumers are alike – meet ‘the 90’, ‘the 9’, and ‘the 1’

Have you ever consulted Wikipedia? You probably did. But have you ever created or adapted a page on the world’s largest reference website? Your answer is probably “no” which is not surprising; only less than 1% of the 1.7 billion unique visitors a month are active contributors.

Keeping up with consumers through online communities

Keeping up with consumers through online communities

COVID-19 has now been around for much longer than any of us would have hoped or expected. Whilst in China…