How Cool Brands Stay Hot wins 2012 Best Book in Marketing Award

Last week the American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) announced ‘How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Branding to Generation Y’ as the winner of the 2012 Berry-AMA Book Prize for the best book in marketing. This award recognizes books whose innovative ideas have had significant impact on marketing and related fields and set the standard for excellence. How Cool Brands Stay Hot by Joeri Van den Bergh (Co-founder and Gen Y expert at InSites Consulting) and Mattias Behrer (SVP, General Manager Youth & Music Northern Europe at Viacom International Media Networks) explains that Generation Y (13-29 year olds) are the most marketing savvy and advertising critical generation ever.
The Berry-AMA Book Prize committee of five marketing experts, led by AMA VP of Publications Robert Lusch, stated that “How Cool Brands Stay Hot is a must read for anyone marketing to Generation Y. Once you start reading it you will immediately start taking notes on how you can enhance your brand’s relevancy to Generation Y”.
Winning co-author Joeri Van den Bergh (co-founder of InSites Consulting): “We are very pleased with this recognition in the US. I believe our book fulfills the need to understand the new empowered consumer generation. Gen Y is a media savvy cohort that incites marketers to change their approach to branding and communicating.”
The 2012 Berry-AMA Book Prize is already the second award for ‘How Cool Brands Stay Hot’. Last year the book won the 2011 Marketing Book of the year Award by Expert Marketer (based on the votes of 2,154 marketers from 85 different countries).
Want to find out more about the book? Visit www.howcoolbrandsstayhot.com or watch this introduction movie.

And don’t forget, this November Joeri is travelling across our different offices (New York, London, Rotterdam & Ghent) to share his story. For more information visit http://smartees.insites-consulting.com.

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