The NewMR Virtual Festival

The festival of NewMR (6-10 December) is a collaborative event, initiated by Ray Poynter and The Future Place.
Goal of the event is to define and shape the future of market research giving participants a change to be involved in the Festival. The video below explains a bit more how you can be involved.

Tom De Ruyck and Annelies Verhaeghe (both Senior Managers at our ForwaR&D Lab) were invited to join the event as speakers. Tom will present ‘Co-creation through conversation‘ and Annelies presents ‘Beyond the hype‘.
Follow the event on Twitter (#NEWMR) or check the website for more information.

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