Joeri Van den Bergh

Joeri Van den Bergh

Managing Partner

 joeri.vandenbergh@insites-consulting.com

 +32 9 269 16 06

Ghent office

Evergemsesteenweg 195

9032 Ghent

Belgium

Bio

Joeri is an awarded global thought leader and marketing author on the impact of Millennials and Generation Z on marketing and business and on consumer trends and futurism. His best-selling marketing book ‘How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Branding to Gen Y and Z’ has been awarded several times (i.a., The American Marketing Association Book Prize).

 

As a marketing professor at one of Europe’s leading business schools (Vlerick), Joeri is continuously updating his insights and foresights on consumer behavior in a fast-changing world. He is increasingly focusing his research and interest on the topics of sustainability: environmental, prosocial and corporate responsibility and activism. Joeri is a London Business School certified alumnus of the Sustainability Leadership and Corporate Responsibility executive course.

 

 

My latest blog posts

Installing sustainable change by tapping into consumer habits – an interview with LIVEKINDLY

Written by Joeri Van den Bergh / Sarah Van Oerle

Consumers increasingly acknowledge that their eating habits have an influence on the environment. In this interview Kees Kruythoff, chairman & CEO at LIVEKINDLY, talks about how the brand supports consumers in cutting down on meat.

Battling food waste – an interview with Danone

Written by Joeri Van den Bergh / Sarah Van Oerle

Find out how Danone is acting upon its mission ‘One Planet. One Health’. An interview with Tine Ryssaert, then Sustainability for Growth Director EDP Belgium at Danone.

Overcoming the sustainability paradox: US consumers want brands to drive change

Written by Joeri Van den Bergh

From more frequent and extreme storms and unprecedented heatwaves to global protests for equal rights and personal freedom, we are feeling the impact of human-caused pressure on planet and people. Sustainability is a key concern amongst consumers, yet many aren’t acting upon it. So where does the problem lie? What’s creating this sustainability paradox?